This is the last update,  from team leader  K7ZO with the OFFICIAL  final totals,
some a little different from the totals below, I think the difference is DUPS.  Also at the bottom of this page are some notes sent into the ARRL for the yearbook.










END of final update section
OK, here is the unofficial totals. For Both WEEKS
W1AW/7 Idaho, one hell of a job.. Who knows that the grand total would be including all the Dup contacts.
 

CALL

Q's 1st week

Q's 2nd week

Station
totals

 

 

 

 

K7CF

2462

5874

8336

KIP

4402

3372

7774

W7ZRC

4195

3175

7370

KTO

2850

3715

6565

WJ9B

4000

1647

5647

KA7T

2512

2355

4867

KM7R

2204

2355

4559

AI7H

1844

2412

4256

W7MEM

901

2377

3278

K7ZO

956

2141

3097

K7TQ

2351

238

2589

N7ESU

1435

806

2241

N7ZN

 

1745

1745

K7HK  &  W7DZX

1653

 

1653

KG7E

1518

 

1518

N4CC

 

1472

1472

K7TM

1453

 

1453

K7ZOX & K7LAN

589

 

589

AC7LI

409

102

511

KO7P

501

 

501

W7CQW

417

 

417

W7MFC

413

 

413

N7UVH

376

 

376

KF7SVI & KF7QIY

365

 

365

K7OJL

340

 

340

WB7DNU

239

95

334

KD7HGS

323

 

323

WWN

286

 

286

ND7O

243

 

243

WB7RBH

173

 

173

W7CQW

 

173

173

KG7H

 

163

163

KF7CQ

100

 

100

WB6DHW

 

93

93

AC6S

 

80

80

KI7I

3

65

68

K7MK

 

65

65

W7EKG

62

 

62

WA7VKE

55

 

55

W7RSK

32

 

32

W7OUU

10

 

10

K1BOB

5

 

5

KA7ERV

5

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

39682

34520

70709

Total QSO's for two weeks (dups removed)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's important to note, numbers don't tell the complete story, some folks worked bands and modes that were less popular or the propagation never worked in their favor.  During the first week, stations were assigned BANDS and MODES. The second week we could chose 2 hour slots, any band or mode. This gave stations more flexibility to pick frequencies that were open.


what a great effort. For a small population state we were #  18th out of 50.. 
 


 

                                                                                                                     END of Unofficial Totals section

The FIRST WEEKs STORIES AND PICTURES Start Here ,
with update Q Count  for stations that participated for two weeks.

As part of the ARRL's Centennial QSO Party,  During the period March 5 thru March 11, 2014
a team of dedicated amateur radio operators in Idaho took to the airways using ARRL's famous
callsign W1AW. They had one simple goal:  "make as many QSO's as you can while still having fun".

This yearbook Chronicles the W1AW/7 operation for the first week, the people and their accomplishments.
for the second week totals,  go all the way to the bottom of this page.. sorry we don't have pictures..
First week.
Team Members, are listed alphabetic by callsign .
Note: more info and pictures about the operators that work at KIP's   are down the page 
a complete set of pictures of all the operators that helped at  KIP's  is at the bottom of the OP's
Operators at KIP , 
Members of the Pocatello Amateur Radio Club.            
listed in no particular order
1518 Q's
 
511 Q's
 
55 Q's
 
334 Q's
 
62 Q's

 
                

 

 

 

340 Q's
 
243 Q's
 
501 Q's
 
and my apologies
 
 to W7MFC , I didn't get his picture
               Scott worked 413 Q's

 to W7RSK , I didn't get his picture
                Steve worked 32 Q's

 

 
286 Q's
 
 
first week totals
first week totals


END OF FIRST WEEK SECTION

 

During the SECOND WEEK,  things were slight less documented, 
here is the list of stations that operated and their QSO count. No pictures, sorry,

 

 



 

 

Some members of team Idaho went to extra special effort to prepare for their stint as W1AW/7.

John K0IP risked the wrath of his neighbors by erecting his portable trailer tower on his driveway
for the whole week.

Harry K7HK was a truly supportive husband and built his wife Darlene W7DZX a 3 element beam for 12 meters to enhance her
signal levels. With this beam, a kilowatt, and her YL voice Darlene attracted them from far and wide and had huge pileups.

Bob K7TM also built an antenna for his 12 meter operating. I remember calling him on the phone to see how his preparations were
going and after his wife retrieved him from the back yard Bob said: "I was rummaging through my antenna bone yard to find enough
pieces to built a 12 meter beam."

LeRoy KF7CQ used the prospect of being W1AW/7 to finally get all the bugs worked out of his satellite station. He did pretty well
with that station, logging 100 satellite QSOs for the week.

 

Several operators also took the opportunity and challenge of being W1AW/7 to expand their operating mode capabilities. Several PSK
only operators added RTTY to their bag of tricks and Scott K7ZO added PSK to his on air noise making.

 

Our approach of assigning an operator to a given band and mode for the whole week really created
a commitment from our team to keep "Their butts in their chairs".
Will WJ9B took his 20 Meter CW assignment so serious that he was personally on the air for 68 hours during the week,
making 4,000 QSOs.
Rod W7ZRC also personally made more than 4,000 QSOs that week. Many of our operators found that being W1AW/7 was
an operating experience like they had never had.
LeRoy KF7CQ offered a summary shared by many: "
I have been playing amateur radio since 1955 but the W1AW/7 adventure
was like going on a major DXpedition as a newly licensed amateur."
I will never forget Don KA7T calling me on the phone practically giggling saying "I never had any idea there were that many
stations on 30 Meters CW". And this from a lifelong DX-er, contester, and past Section Manager.
John KD7HGS was thrilled making his first ever QSO with South Africa. As he related the QSO later: "...And to hit South Africa
on Wednesday about blows my mind. And on a homemade 12 meter dipole."
Mark W7MEM was equally thrilled to work ZS6OB on 2 Meter Earth-Moon-Earth and IW5EKR on 10 Meter FM and IW5EKR
was even mobile!
Our Idaho Section manager Ed AI7H was thrilled to be called by both Dave's K1ZZ and NN1N.
However our most surprising QSO was made by Jim KG7E. As he shared the story: ""Oh yeah...another big surprise
for me was:  right in the middle of the 10 meter pileup I get called by W1UBM. My Mom!!!! Holy crap!!!  
I don't think she's been on HF since the 60s. I guess one of her friends in CT had worked me and told her that I was on
and she went over to his house and gave me a call. I about fell out of my chair."

 

Our operating also provided thrills for those on the other end of the QSO. For most of us just making a QSO at all through a satellite
is close to magic but our satellite operator LeRoy KF7CQ had a couple of extra special ones. As he described: "
There were two
contacts that really gave me a warm fuzzy.  The first was CO6CBF in Cuba who was so excited that he could hardly contain himself. 
I don't think he had ever heard grid square DN13 before in his life. Then there was N8HM who had to stand on his apartment balcony
in a blizzard with his yagi in one hand and a portable in his other hand just to hear me say 'QSL, you're in the log'. As State Leader I
also received e-mails from many happy operators worldwide. My favorite was from Matt M0ZAI who sent us this:

 

Hi

I just thought I'd drop an email to you as I worked W1AW/7 this afternoon whilst QRP. The OP worked so
hard to drag my tiny 4w signal out of the mire! I just wanted to say thanks to you all for my best ever QRP ssb DX,
and that wouldn't have been possible without the patience of your OP.

73

de Matt M0ZAI.

Mike K7CF also worked many low power stations on 80 Meters, a very tough band for that. A one watt East Coast
station made it into his log as did many five watt stations from Japan. As he said: "
I felt like Marconi sometimes, bringing
stations out of the noise and QSB."      Mike through lots of  hard listening worked 2462 stations on SSB and CW on 80 meters,
including lots of DX.   During the Second week Mike produced another 5874 contacts,  becoming the QSO Leader for the
Idaho team,   8336 Q's